Moki

The Inactivity Epidemic

Right now there is an inactivity epidemic that is having a massive impact on the health and wellbeing of children and the damage to society in the future will be huge. The World Health Organization warns that it’s not just children's health that is being affected but also their brain development and social skills.

We believe schools are the front line in the war on inactivity and deserve the best possible tools technology has to offer.

"If you can't measure something,
you can't improve it."

- Peter Drucker

Why Moki?

From top of the range Fitbits to low grade Alibaba bargains, teachers have struggled to make other fitness trackers work in schools. Moki has been developed with schools, for schools and is stacked full of original features that make it perfect for the setting. Moki gives schools the power to measure how active every child is and then helps motivate every child to move more.

Fitness trackers have been around for ages and there is a massive range available but none of them are like Moki.

"From Day One, the children have been completely invested and incredibly excited. And it’s never, ever worn off!"

- Stacey Cannon, Selby Abbey Primary School

What have we achieved?

Moki is being used in more than 350 schools across the UK, Europe, the US and Canada. We have recorded close to 500 million steps from over 10,000 children.

We have partnered with DGi in Denmark to offer 50 schools access to Moki and in the UK we are working closely with London Sport, Yorkshire Sport, Sport Tech Hub and more.

But this is just the beginning.

"Moki has the potential to make a huge difference at both a local and national level."

- Søren Brixen, CEO, DGI

What's next?

Moki already has enough data to reveal fascinating trends across different ages, genders and regions for the first time. Moki data can help education authorities, research bodies, local and central governments understand the impact of active learning and implement change.

It is our ultimate ambition for Moki data to be used as the standard for international research into the way kids move.